COMING IN COMING IN April

A New Way to Think About State and Local Economic Development

Yogi Berra supposedly claimed "the future ain't what it used to be" --- well either is our past.

Back to the Future of American Economic Development.

How we got to where we are today helps to understand how we get to where we need to go. 

A bold new approach for the Journal of Applied Research in Economic Development is appearing on your screen in April.

A FREE ONLINE Introduction to the History of American State and Local Economic Development from George Washington to Donald Trump

For Further Information Click Here

Why Do We Need a Bold New Approach--Read our Latest Issue

"Has Economic Development Lost its Ability to Innovate: Can We Practice What We Preach?

Latest Articles

September 2017

Use Three Wave History at Your Peril: Rediscovering Past American State and Local Economic Development

American state & local economic development enjoys a long and meaningful history yet is largely unknown to economic developers. Why? Our professional past has been collapsed into vaporous and ideological-laden “Three Waves”. Three Wave history polarizes and misinforms us about our three hundred year heritage/professional experience.
Isn’t it time we discover who we are as a profession?
The Four Eras of American state & local ED are an excellent start to appreciating the value of our professional history.

May 2017

As Two Ships: the History of American State and Local Economic Development Since 1789 to the 1980’s

American state and local economic development (ED) has been around since Day One (1789) of the American Republic. My recently-published “History of American State and Local Economic Development, 1789-1990: As Two Ships Pass in the Night” (As Two Ships) presents our historical evolution from George Washington to 1990—all 752 pages of it.
Future issues of the Journal will present observations drawn from As Two Ships along with additional insight and applied to current affairs. These observations will provide a base to rethink one’s ideas regarding the history–and purpose–of American state and local economic development. They can open you to new ways on how to approach your job, research, and your profession.

This issue will discuss the core fundamentals of my history and also will introduce what the “Chapter One Model” and the two approaches, Community Development and Mainstream ED–our Two Ships–that bisect our profession.

January 2017

Breaking Up [Paradigms] is so Hard-to-Do

President Trump’s challenge compels us to confront the Forgotten People problem swept under the rug by economic developers current paradigms: innovation, knowledge-based economics, university-led economic development, and “gazelle” clusters and occupations. The January article redefines Forgotten People, presents an alternative way to “do” economic development at the state and local level and offers four thought-provoking programs that involve nothing less than a new approach to economic and community development–a community-based, community rebuilding, Back to the New Deal, service sector-focused skills-development employment.