COMING IN COMING IN April

A New Way to Think About State and Local Economic Development

Yogi Berra supposedly claimed "the future ain't what it used to be" --- well either is our past.

Back to the Future of American Economic Development.

How we got to where we are today helps to understand how we get to where we need to go. 

A bold new approach for the Journal of Applied Research in Economic Development is appearing on your screen in April.

A FREE ONLINE Introduction to the History of American State and Local Economic Development from George Washington to Donald Trump

For Further Information Click Here

Why Do We Need a Bold New Approach--Read our Latest Issue

"Has Economic Development Lost its Ability to Innovate: Can We Practice What We Preach?

Latest Articles

July 2015

Questioning Paradigms: Manchester England and the Plight of Legacy Cities

Manchester and other northern UK cities share many of the same problems as our Northeast and Midwest Great Lakes legacy cities–they have lost a great deal of their economic meaning because of changes in logistics and deindustrialization. At the moment their national government has launched a major effort to promote “northern cities” economic development. What can we learn from them?

June 2015

Questioning the Value of Economic Multiplier Estimates

What if anything do estimated economic multipliers really mean? What are some basic principles policymakers should use when thinking about the prospective impact of new projects in their communities? Click Questioning the Value of Economic Multiplier Estimates and see what Edward G. Keating, Irina Danescu, and Robert Murphy from the RAND Corporation have to say?

May 2015

Chambers of Commerce: First Wave Magicians of Main Street

Can you believe up to now no one has written a modern history of American chambers of commerce? Not until Chris Mead recently published his one-of-a-kind Magicians on Main Street. So let’s use Magicians of Main Street and investigate how well the conventional wisdom concerning the FIRST Wave of economic development holds up. If the First Wave doesn’t prove accurate–what does it say about the other two waves?