COMING IN COMING IN April

A New Way to Think About State and Local Economic Development

Yogi Berra supposedly claimed "the future ain't what it used to be" --- well either is our past.

Back to the Future of American Economic Development.

How we got to where we are today helps to understand how we get to where we need to go. 

A bold new approach for the Journal of Applied Research in Economic Development is appearing on your screen in April.

A FREE ONLINE Introduction to the History of American State and Local Economic Development from George Washington to Donald Trump

For Further Information Click Here

Why Do We Need a Bold New Approach--Read our Latest Issue

"Has Economic Development Lost its Ability to Innovate: Can We Practice What We Preach?

Latest Articles

April 2015

Economic Developers: Ignore the Glitz! Focus on What Matters

The core idea behind this series of articles is to help local economic developers navigate and function effectively within their communities–sort of an on-the-job helpful advice. In this issue, we deepen our understanding of the Policy/Practitioner World nexus building upon two elements introduced in the first issue. To penetrate more deeply into the local situation, we will also introduce a new concept: “the policy cycle”. The thrust of our article/series is to move from the glitz–concentrate on making programs work–concentrate on developing programs that address community concerns. problems, and opportunities as they see and feel them.

March 2015

What the Heck is Going On with Local Economic Development?

I’m amazed how little is written about what goes on at the state and local levels.

Most of us work in a community or at the state level and our daily professional lives are a lot more complicated than simply “creating jobs/clusters”, “preparing knowledge-based workers” or “developing disruptive entrepreneurs”. OK–there is the usual flood of blogs describing new policy issues, incredibly brilliant programs, and cutting-edge economic development strategies. But there is precious little about what it is like to work in sub-state economic development. There is seldom anyone who writes about how things get done locally and how a local economic developer can function effectively. That is what this issue is about.

February 2015

The Vanishing Neighbor

Marc J. Dunkelman, The Vanishing Neighbor: the Transformation of American Community Why should an economic developer read a political sociology book? Because economic growth or decline is not simply the result of good and bad economics! Politics, cultural values, and changes in our personal lifestyles and relationships surprisingly can affect our success at the local and state levels. Despite its strange sounding name, the Vanishing Neighbor explores how economic changes generate societal changes with political consequences that make it difficult to develop effective solutions to address economic and social problems in our communities. What happens if societal change causes economic stagnation, inequality, and political gridlock? That’s what Dunkelman is trying to help us think through. Why does a vanishing neighbor change how we do our jobs?