COMING IN COMING IN April

A New Way to Think About State and Local Economic Development

Yogi Berra supposedly claimed "the future ain't what it used to be" --- well either is our past.

Back to the Future of American Economic Development.

How we got to where we are today helps to understand how we get to where we need to go. 

A bold new approach for the Journal of Applied Research in Economic Development is appearing on your screen in April.

A FREE ONLINE Introduction to the History of American State and Local Economic Development from George Washington to Donald Trump

For Further Information Click Here

Why Do We Need a Bold New Approach--Read our Latest Issue

"Has Economic Development Lost its Ability to Innovate: Can We Practice What We Preach?

Latest Articles

August 2014

Are Economic Developers Still Held Hostage to the Mobility of Capital?

Economic development’s most deep-seated axiom is that capital is mobile, people can exit, and business can move to greener pastures. How do we get our collective hands around the sad fact nothing is tied down, and our job description/paycheck require us to wave some magic wand and make the problem go away? Paul Peterson’s classic City Limits (1881), questions whether a city can overcome the mobility of capital. Let’s update Peterson and see how things have changed.

July 2014

Speaking as a Unit of Human Capital

This inequality debate is nothing but potential trouble for economic developers? An economic developer can potentially produce inequality no matter what he or she does. The first step in dealing with inequality is to understand what causes it. For one answer we turn to Brink Lindsey, Human Capitalism: How Economic Growth Has Made Us Smarter–And More Unequal. Lindsey presently with the Cato Institute was a former Senior Research Fellow at Kauffman. His argument turns knowledge-based economics, a popular economic development approach, on its head–suggesting it inadvertently plays a major role in causing inequality.

June 2014